Inclusion, Diversity and Equity

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Our people

Inclusion, Diversity and Equity

We embrace and harness diversity of background, experience and perspective.

We are committed to creating an inclusive environment where all colleagues thrive and reach their full potential, whatever their gender identity, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation and socio-economic background.

To help us achieve this, our Inclusion, Diversity and Equity action plan focuses on four pillars: Leadership and Culture; Recruitment; Retention and Engagement; and Progression. Initiatives and interventions in each of these areas address every stage of someone's career. We've already made important commitments in this space, and continue to challenge ourselves, confront biases and listen and learn from each other to ensure we create an inclusive environment for all.

We use the tool below to track progress on the diversity of our workforce:

2020
2019
2018
Firm-wide
Partner
Director
Senior manager
Senior representation
Junior representation

Gender / Partner

76.1%
23.9%
Male
Female | 2022 target: 25%

Gender / Director

65.8%
34.2%
Male
Female | 2022 target: 39%

Gender / Senior manager

54.2%
45.8%
Male
Female | 2022 target: 49%

Gender / Senior representation

60.7%
39.3%
Male
Female

Gender / Junior representation

47.6%
52.4%
Male
Female

Gender / Firm-wide

51.2%
48.8%
Male
Female

Gender / Partner

78.5%
21.5%
Male
Female | 2022 target: 25%

Gender / Director

67%
33%
Male
Female | 2022 target: 39%

Gender / Senior manager

55%
45%
Male
Female | 2022 target: 49%

Gender / Senior representation

62%
38%
Male
Female

Gender / Junior representation

48%
52%
Male
Female

Gender / Firm-wide

51%
49%
Male
Female

Gender / Partner

81%
19%
Male
Female | 2022 target: 25%

Gender / Director

69%
31%
Male
Female | 2022 target: 39%

Gender / Senior manager

57%
43%
Male
Female | 2022 target: 49%

Gender / Senior representation

64%
36%
Male
Female

Gender / Junior representation

47%
53%
Male
Female

Gender / Firm-wide

52%
48%
Male
Female
Firm-wide
Partner
Director
Senior manager
Senior representation
Junior representation

Ethnic minority / Partner

9%
83%
8%
Ethnic minority | 2022 target: 11%
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Director

12%
78%
10%
Ethnic minority | 2022 target: 15%
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Senior manager

19%
69%
12%
Ethnic minority | 2022 target: 22%
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Senior representation

15%
74%
11%
Ethnic minority
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Junior representation

29%
51%
20%
Ethnic minority
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Firm-wide

25%
57%
18%
Ethnic minority
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Partner

8%
86%
6%
Ethnic minority | 2022 target: 11%
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Director

12%
79%
9%
Ethnic minority | 2022 target: 15%
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Senior manager

17%
71%
12%
Ethnic minority | 2022 target: 22%
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Senior representation

14%
75%
11%
Ethnic minority
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Junior representation

28%
53%
19%
Ethnic minority
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Firm-wide

24%
59%
17%
Ethnic minority
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Partner

8%
88%
4%
Ethnic minority | 2022 target: 11%
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Director

12%
81%
7%
Ethnic minority | 2022 target: 15%
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Senior manager

17%
74%
9%
Ethnic minority | 2022 target: 22%
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Senior representation

14%
78%
8%
Ethnic minority
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Junior representation

26%
57%
17%
Ethnic minority
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

Ethnic minority / Firm-wide

23%
62%
15%
Ethnic minority
White
Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)
Firm-wide
Senior representation
Junior representation
Not disclosed

Black Heritage / Senior representation

1.7%

Black Heritage / Junior representation

4.9%

Black Heritage / Firm-wide

4.1%

Black Heritage / Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

17.9%

Black Heritage / Senior representation

1.4%

Black Heritage / Junior representation

4.7%

Black Heritage / Firm-wide

3.9%

Black Heritage / Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

19.9%

Black Heritage / Senior representation

1%

Black Heritage / Junior representation

4%

Black Heritage / Firm-wide

4%

Black Heritage / Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

15%
Firm-wide
Senior representation
Junior representation
Not disclosed

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Senior representation

2.6%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Junior representation

3.1%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Firm-wide

3%
2022 target: 3%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

20.7%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Senior representation

3%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Junior representation

3%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Firm-wide

2.7%
2022 target: 3%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

20%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Senior representation

3%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Junior representation

3%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Firm-wide

2.4%
2022 target: 3%

Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual / Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

17%
Firm-wide
Senior representation
Junior representation
Not disclosed

Disability / Senior representation

6.4%

Disability / Junior representation

7.2%

Disability / Firm-wide

7%
2022 target: 6.7%

Disability / Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

19.9%

Disability / Senior representation

6%

Disability / Junior representation

7%

Disability / Firm-wide

6.9%
2022 target: 6.7%

Disability / Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

19%

Disability / Senior representation

7%

Disability / Junior representation

6%

Disability / Firm-wide

6.4%
2022 target: 6.7%

Disability / Not disclosed (including prefer not to say and no declaration made)

17%
Firm-wide
Senior representation
Junior representation
Graduate & Apprentice intake

Socio-economic background / Firm-wide

2020 Socio-economic background - Firm-wide
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Socio-economic background / Senior representation

2020 Socio-economic background - Senior representation
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Socio-economic background / Junior representation

2020 Socio-economic background - Junior representation
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Socio-economic background / Graduate & Apprentice intake

2020 Socio-economic background - Graduate & Apprentice intake
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Eligible for free school meals

Graduate, school leaver and apprentice offers accepted.

Graduate
11%
Apprentice
14%

State educated (type of school attended)

Graduate, school leaver and apprentice offers accepted.

Graduate
68%
Apprentice
90%

Socio-economic background / Firm-wide

2019 Socio-economic background - Firm-wide
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Socio-economic background / Senior representation

2019 Socio-economic background - Senior representation
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Socio-economic background / Junior representation

2019 Socio-economic background - Junior representation
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Socio-economic background / Graduate & Apprentice intake

2019 Socio-economic background - Graduate & Apprentice intake
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Eligible for free school meals

Graduate, school leaver and apprentice offers accepted.

Graduate
12%
Apprentice
21%

State educated (type of school attended)

Graduate, school leaver and apprentice offers accepted.

Graduate
68%
Apprentice
92%

Socio-economic background / Firm-wide

2018 Socio-economic background - Firm-wide
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Socio-economic background / Senior representation

2018 Socio-economic background - Senior representation
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Socio-economic background / Junior representation

2018 Socio-economic background - Junior representation
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Socio-economic background / Graduate & Apprentice intake

2018 Socio-economic background - Graduate & Apprentice intake
Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations
Intermediate occupations
Routine and manual occupations
Never worked or long-term unemployed
Prefer not to say

Eligible for free school meals

Graduate, school leaver and apprentice offers accepted.

Graduate
11%
Apprentice
19%

State educated (type of school attended)

Graduate, school leaver and apprentice offers accepted.

Graduate
66%
Apprentice
88%
Female graduate new joiners / 49.1% FY20
Female apprentice new joiners / 50.6% FY20
Female Partner and Director new joiners / 42.6% FY20
Ethnic minority Partner and Director new joiners / 7.4% FY20

We aim to attract extraordinary people

We strive to attract people from all backgrounds and empower them to reach their full potential.

Insight and work experience programmes

Our Insight programmes have been designed to help students find out more about working life at KPMG. Through these routes, students can discover more about the work we do, as well as the teams they could join if they choose to embark on a career with us. Designed to bring more female and Black heritage talent into the firm, successful participants are fast-tracked onto a KPMG graduate programme if they successfully complete the programme assessments. Pathways that currently exist include: Women in Deal Advisory, Women in Technology and the Black Heritage Insight programme.

Our work experience programmes are focused on promoting social mobility. As part of our commitment to Access Accountancy, all our KPMG Discovery work experience places are for candidates from low socio-economic backgrounds. Our 'One+1' programme ensures that access to valuable work experience opportunities is extended to those without connections to professional organisations. Delivered in conjunction with the Social Mobility Foundation, this programme offers young people from low socio-economic backgrounds opportunities across our London, Leeds, Manchester, Birmingham, Glasgow and Liverpool offices.

Getting an insight: Black Heritage Talent Insight programme

Kumi joined the Black Heritage Talent Insight programme in September 2020. She wanted to work in an accountancy firm but worried she didn't have the right experience. The initiative invites final year students and graduates to take part in an assessment and, if successful, secure a place on one of our graduate programmes. Our insight programmes enable participants to see what KPMG is like before they join, meeting others from different parts of the firm. "I loved meeting other people on the scheme," says Kumi. "Hearing their stories and their pathways was really interesting because mine wasn't a traditional one." Kumi now works in transaction services in Deal Advisory. "I was able to find the perfect fit for me."

Kumi / Graduate Trainee

We support our people in their careers

We want to create a truly open and inclusive culture, where everyone has a voice and where everyone can thrive.

Listening to our people

Listening and responding to issues raised by our people is critical to us achieving an open and inclusive culture.

Our Global People Survey takes place annually. We also run more regular 'pulse' surveys, which over the past year have been focussed on the impact of COVID-19 on colleagues' wellbeing and ways of working. We use the responses to these surveys to identify what immediate and longer-term action we can take to support our people better.

The Employee Business Forum comprises elected colleague members, which represent each grade and region of our firm. As representatives of our colleague population, they engage with our leadership on important issues and share their opinions to help shape decisions.

Our Shadow Boards also provide constructive feedback to leadership and they act as ambassadors for sharing new ideas across the firm too. There's a Shadow Board in each of our regional offices. Members are appointed based on their potential, their passion and their expertise.

Find out more about how we empower our people to speak up

86% / of colleagues feel they are treated with dignity and respect at work* 2020 Global People Survey

*Data based on 7,302 colleague responses to our 2020 Global People Survey

Employee Networks

We want to offer an inclusive environment where everyone feels empowered. Our 15 Employee Networks help us do just that:

  • African and Caribbean Network
  • Be Mindful – Mental Health and wellbeing
  • Breathe – KPMG's LGBT Network
  • China Club
  • Christians in KPMG
  • Families Network
  • Forces in the Firm
  • Hindu Network
  • India Club
  • Jewish Society
  • KNOW – KPMG's Network of Women
  • Muslim Network
  • Sikh Network
  • Social Mobility Network
  • WorkAbility – KPMG's Disability Network

These networks are open to all, provide a sense of community and provide learning experiences for those who want to increase their own diversity awareness and become an ally. Throughout the year, they host inspirational and educational events helping to raise awareness for, and to celebrate, key moments in the calendar. Our networks make a big difference to life at our firm.

Employee networks / 15
A platform to learn, develop and network

In 2002, when Mark was 19, he started working in the city, having deferred university for a year. He felt like his options were endless. This changed weeks later when a doctor told Mark he would be registered as severely sight impaired (blind). "At the time I thought my life was over," says Mark. "Looking back, it made me the person I am now."

Mark came across KPMG's Disability network and felt it gave him a platform to develop, learn and access an incredible network of individuals both inside and outside of KPMG. He became chair of the WorkAbility network and says that this became a springboard to his career in Inclusion, Diversity and Equity. "I am proud to work for a company that values difference," says Mark. "And I'm proud to work alongside people that want you to create, and achieve, your own ambitions".

Mark / Manager

Addressing potential barriers to progression

We do this in a number of ways. Whether it's through our award-winning GROW programme, which helps our diverse talent maximise their career potential and advancement; through our mentoring programmes; or through our proportional approach to our promotions, performance, talent management and recruitment.

Focusing our support on specific challenges and barriers

We recognise that historically underrepresented groups need tailored support to address the specific challenges and barriers they may face. We also recognise that our identities, backgrounds and circumstances are multi-faceted. By taking a holistic approach to inclusion, we ensure that intersectional impacts are visible.

In 2016 we were one of 13 organisations to achieve Disability Confident Leader status at the inception of the Department for Work and Pensions programme. We are proud that our leader status was validated again in 2020.

From a recruitment perspective, we ensure that candidates requiring additional support or an adjustment have access to specific guidance, via our careers website. Our external recruitment efforts are supported by dedicated disability-focused partnerships with organisations such as MyPlus Consulting and Employability. We also run specific events for disabled students on campus and in KPMG offices. In 2018 we started working with Auticon, an IT and compliance consultancy that only recruits consultants with an Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC). Our Audit and Technology teams take on Auticon consultants, which will help us to build our understanding of neuro-diverse talent.

Our Workability and Be Mindful Employee Networks help to promote awareness of disability and mental health. They also provide a community and safe space for those with lived experiences, and a platform for all colleagues to become allies.

At the heart of our efforts is collaboration. As well as being recognised as a Disability Confident Leader, we're also a long-standing partner member of the Business Disability Forum and a global signatory of the Valuable 500. In addition, we have representatives on the Disability Confident Business Leaders Group, Business Disability Forum Presidents Group and on the This Is Me Steering Committee. We're a founding member of the City Mental Health Alliance.

We're working hard to increase the ethnic diversity of our teams at all levels of our firm. To do this effectively, we need to be transparent about where we are as a business. We have voluntarily published our Ethnicity Pay Gap since 2017 and in 2021, published our Black Heritage Pay Gap for the first time too (based on April 2020 data).

The Black Lives Matter movement has created a moment in history. And it's a moment we don't want to waste. We have committed to redoubling our efforts at every level, to push harder for faster and more significant change in our firm. We're working together on five priority areas as part of our Black Lives Action Plan:

  • We've introduced dedicated resources to work on Black inclusion full-time.
  • We've brought in external expertise to support our efforts and constructively challenge us.
  • We've committed to at least doubling our Black population in leadership positions by 2022 - one year in, we’re around 70% of the way there. And by engaging executive search firms to help us recruit Black talent into senior positions and introducing initiatives such as our Black Heritage Talent Programme – we’re building a strong pipeline of future Black leaders.
  • We've asked everyone to commit to educating themselves. Our Allyship programme already has over 1,000 colleague participants and helps us all learn from each other, and act as role model sponsors of our black talent. Building on this success, we’ve just launched a Cross-Company Allyship Programme, which gives KPMG and client mentors and mentees the opportunity to gain experience and access networks from other organisations.
  • And finally, our leadership has committed to driving this change and being held accountable for its success.

We convene and collaborate with a number of external organisations to drive change in this area. We are represented on the BITC Race Equality Leadership Team, Black Leaders Network, Black Professional Services Collective and CBI BAME in Tech group. Our leaders are also CBI Change the Race Ratio Ambassadors. As a firm, we have signed up to the BITC Race at Work Charter, as well as the Charter for Black Talent in Finance and the Professions.

We are also proud to be part of the 10,000 Black Interns programme, which involves 24 firms from different sectors. From Summer 2022, the programme will offer a minimum of six weeks’ paid work experience, training and development aimed specifically at students of Black heritage. And we host an annual KPMG Black Entrepreneur Awards, which aims to inspire, accelerate and celebrate success among Black heritage entrepreneurs.

We have been named in the Times Top 50 Employers for Women for 11 consecutive years. We are proud to have been one of the first businesses to voluntarily publish our Gender Pay Gap, ahead of there being a legal requirement to do so, too.

From a student recruitment perspective, we aim for a gender balance across our graduate and apprentice intake. One of the ways we support this aim is to ensure our interviewer and assessor pool is gender-balanced, whenever possible. Our external recruitment efforts are supported by dedicated female-focused partnerships with organisations such as STEM Women, IT's Not Just for the Boys and Women in the City Afro-Caribbean Network. Our university events, society sponsorships and course targeting is female-focused too. Our Insight programmes, including Women in Deal Advisory and Women in Technology, help raise awareness of routes into our firm and help build early talent pipelines.

From an experienced hire perspective, we've briefed recruitment agencies on our desire for diverse candidate shortlists. We've also ensured that every job advertisement uses gender neutral language and explicitly states that all roles can be performed flexibly. Our Return to Work programme, through training and mentoring, supports women who've taken a career break of 18+ months to transition back to a career in Audit or Tax & Legal. Our IT's Her Future programme also helps to attract, empower and develop women in technology.

The support for women does not stop at the recruitment stage. KPMG's Network of Women (KNOW) exists to celebrate and promote gender balance and to provide opportunities for colleagues to share experiences and gain guidance on professional development. Our Intelligent Working policy accommodates any working schedule outside of the traditional pattern and is available for all colleagues. Our Empowering Parents programme offers coaching and resources to support parents/carers before and after returning to work, and throughout their child's life. All our people policies are family friendly and have been reviewed to ensure gender neutral language is used. Employees are entitled to 52 weeks' pregnancy and maternity leave, consisting of 18 weeks full pay, followed by 21 weeks statutory maternity pay. We also offer 16 weeks full pay for Shared Parental leave and provide time off for parents undertaking fertility treatment or adopting via surrogacy too.

At the heart of our efforts is collaboration. Since its inception in 2016, KPMG have sponsored the Hampton-Alexander Review - a 5-year plan to increase gender parity in senior positions across FTSE 350 businesses. We're represented on groups including Women in Tech, Women of the Future, Council for investing in women entrepreneurs, Women on the Wharf and the Fawcett Society Pay & Progression of Women of Colour advisory group. KPMG are also the Global Lead Sponsors of Women Corporate Directors. And, we've signed up to HM Treasury's Women in Finance Charter and the Tech Talent Charter too.

We have been named in the Stonewall Top 100 Employers for the last five consecutive years. We were proud to lead by example by voluntarily publishing our Sexual Orientation Pay Gap in 2020, ahead of there being a legal requirement to do so.

From a recruitment perspective, we run events for LGBT+ students on university campuses and at our offices. We are the co-founders of AuthentiCity, an annual recruitment event for LGBT+ students looking to explore career opportunities in Professional Services, Finance, Fund Management or Technology, in the City. Students are offered the opportunity to meet representatives from a number of firms, including ours, to gain a valuable insight into their work and their experiences of being LGBTQ+ in the workplace.

Our award winning Breathe Network exists to celebrate and promote LGBT+ awareness and to provide opportunities for colleagues to share experiences, gain guidance on professional development and to engage non-LGBT+ colleagues. The network also engages our clients in raising LGBT+ awareness. In addition, they work with leading LGBT+ charities, and engage in thought leadership, to help improve the workplace for everyone and the experience for LGBT+ people throughout the UK and beyond.

Promoting trans inclusion is important to us. All our policy documents have been reviewed and updated to ensure that the language used is gender neutral. We have updated our diversity monitoring questionnaire to include questions that enable our colleagues to disclose their trans status if they wish, and to help us better understand the diversity make-up of our firm. We have processes in place to support colleagues who wish to change their name, gender marker and/or title on KPMG systems.

We have been ranked in the top three of the Social Mobility Employer Index since it started in 2017.

We've undertaken work with the Bridge Group to understand how socio-economic background, gender and ethnicity impacts employees' progression in the firm and are increasing our understanding of our people and their backgrounds. This year, we're reporting our Socio-Economic Background Pay Gap for the first time, providing a recommended methodology in partnership with the Bridge Group, with the aim of encouraging others to do the same. By highlighting where these gaps and barriers are most prevalent, we're able to focus our activity accordingly.

Our 'Discovery' work experience programme, in support of Access Accountancy, is dedicated to supporting young people from lower socio-economic backgrounds, with many going on to apply for and join the KPMG360° apprenticeship scheme. While our One+1 programme, in collaboration with the Social Mobility Foundation, matches placements provided for KPMG employees contacts with students without such connections. In 2019 we launched our Black Heritage Talent Insight Programme. Whilst the programme is aimed at increasing representation of Black Heritage talent, we consciously partner with selected third-party organisations to support with attraction, in part due to their reach amongst students from a lower socio-economic background. Of the 2020 intake for this programme 67% of attendees were from non-selective state schools, and 53% were eligible for free school meals – both measures higher than our broader Graduate intake. 70% of participants were made graduate offers.

We apply a place-based approach to our community initiatives to make sure we're targeting the areas of greatest need, working alongside local stakeholders, governments and charities to help tackle regional inequalities. Almost 20% of our 2020 community beneficiaries were from areas across the UK which have poor social mobility outcomes (coldspots). We're aiming to increase this to 30% by 2022.

From being one of the first accredited Living Wage employers in 2012, to being the founding partner of the UK's National Numeracy Day in 2018, KPMG has led on this agenda for over a decade. In 2020, we supported the Social Mobility Commission with the planning and delivery of the Professional and Financial Services toolkit. Our leaders also represent our firm on groups such as the City of London socio-economic diversity taskforce, Living Wage Advisory Council and Patchwork Foundation.

Find out more about our Socio-Economic Background Pay Gap report

Our leaders are driving change

Our UK Board is the most diverse it's ever been and leaders from across the firm have committed to achieving Inclusion, Diversity and Equity targets in their areas. Our Inclusive Leadership Board, which comprises both internal and external members, continues to challenge our progress against our commitment to create an inclusive environment where all colleagues thrive and reach their full potential. Our Black Lives Action Plan looks specifically at improving Black career progression in the firm.

Female UK Board members / 56% 9-Sep-21 spot count
Ethnic minority UK Board members / 22% 9-Sep-21 spot count
Female partner promotions / 28.9% FY20
Ethnic minority partner promotions / 22% FY20
Becoming more transparent on the ways we want to show progress and change

In June 2020, the firm announced plans to speed up inclusion and diversity at our business. John Amaechi OBE, a psychologist and world-leading adviser, agreed to guide our work.

"In the past, I have not been convinced that everybody believes that change needs to happen," says John. "At this point, I think the vast majority of people realise that there is nothing political, or politically correct, about wanting to be anti-racist."

The strength of feeling following the murder of George Floyd was a painful reminder of how much more we need to do to support, develop and retain our ethnic minority colleagues. When the world spoke up in outrage, colleagues at KPMG did too.

"Everybody at every grade wants to see change because they realise that equity for Black colleagues does not mean inequity for white colleagues. It doesn't mean that anybody is going to end up worse off. Everybody ends up better off," says John. "I think there is real energy behind this. We are putting in tangible and transparent structures that will enable these efforts against discrimination and racism to continue long after the media interest dies."

John Amaechi OBE / Founder & Everyday Jedi at APS Intelligence Ltd.

Our remuneration and pay gaps

We're an accredited Living Wage employer

Fair-pay is a fundamental driver of social mobility – an issue high on our agenda to ensure we are accessing and recruiting from the widest pool of talent. Paying the living wage not only reduces in-work poverty, it also makes business sense - reducing costs to the business, improving competitiveness, market position and profitability.

In 2006, we became one of the very first businesses to pay the Living Wage to its employees and contracted staff. We went on to become a founding member of the Living Wage Foundation and have continued to provide financial and strategic support ever since. Our Head of Inclusion, Diversity and Equity was appointed Chair of the Living Wage Advisory Council in June 2021.

Our long-standing partnership with the Living Wage Foundation has helped to grow this initiative into a movement of over 8,000 accredited Living Wage Employers, 2,600 of which signed up during the COVID-19 pandemic. Since its inception, the Living Wage campaign has put back more than £1.53bn into the pockets of over 260,000 low-paid workers.

Collaboration is key in driving change, and that's why we're supporting our suppliers and our clients to implement the Living Wage across their businesses too.

Reporting our socio-economic background pay gaps for the first time

As a firm, we've prioritised driving social mobility for over a decade. This includes working with our local communities to raise skills and aspirations, challenging our recruitment and promotion processes and being the first firm to publish comprehensive socio-economic background workforce data in 2016. This level of transparency has allowed us to understand the barriers that exist and to hold ourselves to account to change.

This year, we're continuing to challenge ourselves to go further by reporting our socio-economic background pay gaps for the first time. We're one of the first organisations to do so. We've worked with experts in the field of social equality, the Bridge Group, to advise us on the chosen method of calculation (parental occupation groups), the reasoning for this, the definition of socio-economic background and the terminology used in our report.

We know pay gaps are just one part of the picture. What's important is what we do with that data. That's why we're also publishing a social mobility action plan to set out how we're addressing our pay gaps.

We're also setting a socio-economic background representation target for the first time, alongside our other diversity targets. We are aiming for 29 per cent of our Partners and Directors to be from a working-class background by 2030.

We hope by publishing our socio-economic background pay gaps and setting a socio-economic background representation target, we can open up this conversation and encourage other businesses to do the same.

Find out more

We use parental occupation as the measure for our socio-economic background pay gaps, identified by the Bridge Group, and other social mobility experts, as the most robust and reliable indicator. Please see our full report for the explanation of the occupation groups we’ve used.

The total in-scope KPMG population, including partners, for base pay socio-economic background pay reporting is 10,444. This data covers over 70 per cent of our workforce and the pay gaps are based on hourly pay taken at 5 April 2021.

As parental occupation is defined in three main groups, we are using a tiered methodology, recommended by the Bridge Group, to show several binary pay gaps.

These outline the difference in average pay between employees who have declared their parental occupation in a specific group, comparing professional vs. working class, professional vs. intermediate and intermediate vs. working class.

We are reporting our socio-economic background pay gaps for the first time this year and on a voluntary basis.

Find out more about our Socio-Economic Background Pay Gap report

Professional vs working class

Median socio-economic background pay gaps as of April 2021, including partners
8.6%
Mean socio-economic background pay gaps as of April 2021, including partners
-1.1%

Professional vs intermediate

Median socio-economic background pay gaps as of April 2021, including partners
2.2%
Mean socio-economic background pay gaps as of April 2021, including partners
3.2%

Intermediate vs working class

Median socio-economic background pay gaps as of April 2021, including partners
6.6%
Mean socio-economic background pay gaps as of April 2021, including partners
-4.5%

The mean socio-economic background pay gaps are calculated by adding up all of the pay of KPMG employees and dividing it by the number of employees. The median socio-economic background pay gaps, however, are calculated by lining up all of KPMG's employees' pay and finding the mid-point for 'professional', 'intermediate' and 'working class'. The difference between the two mid-points in each instance is the median socio-economic background pay gap.

The gender pay gap is the measure of the difference in average pay between all men and all women across an organisation, regardless of their role, level, length of service or location and any other differentiating factors.

Although not required by statute, these figures relate to all KPMG staff and partners. The pay gaps are based on hourly pay taken at 5 April 2020. Bonus pay is based on bonuses paid up to the period 5 April 2020.

Median pay gap as of April 2020, including partners
16.9%
Reduced by 5.2% points from 2019 (22.1%)
Mean pay gap as of April 2020, including partners
36.2%
Reduced by 3.2% points from 2019 (39.4%)

Although not required by statute, these figures relate to all KPMG staff and partners. The pay gaps are based on hourly pay taken at 5 April 2020. Bonus pay is based on bonuses paid up to the period 5 April 2020.

The mean pay gap is calculated by adding up all of the pay of KPMG employees and dividing it by the number of employees. The median pay gap is calculated by lining up all of KPMG's employees' pay and finding the mid-point for each category. The difference between those two mid points is the median pay gap.

Median basic pay gap as of April 2020, excluding partners
13.9%
Reduced by 4.7% points from 2019 (18.6%)
Mean basic pay gap as of April 2020, excluding partners
16.5%
Reduced by 2.1% points from 2019 (18.6%)

This is the difference in average pay between men and women, excluding partners.

The mean pay gap is calculated by adding up all of the pay of KPMG employees and dividing it by the number of employees. The median pay gap is calculated by lining up all of KPMG's employees' pay and finding the mid-point for each category. The difference between those two mid points is the median pay gap.

Median bonus pay gap as of April 2020, excluding partners
31.5%
Reduced by 1.8% points from 2019 (33.3%)
78.1% - % of females to receive a bonus
75.9% - % of males to receive a bonus
Mean bonus pay gap as of April 2020, excluding partners
43.2%
Reduced by 4.9% points from 2019 (48.1%)
78.1% - % of females to receive a bonus
75.9% - % of males to receive a bonus

This is the difference in average bonus paid between men and women who received a bonus, excluding partners. The total in-scope KPMG population for bonus gender pay reporting is 14,138 with a male/female split of 7,094/7,044.

The mean pay gap is calculated by adding up all of the pay of KPMG employees and dividing it by the number of employees. The median pay gap is calculated by lining up all of KPMG's employees' pay and finding the mid-point for each category. The difference between those two mid points is the median pay gap.

Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4

Pay quartiles – colleagues / Q1 lower

54.2%
45.8%
Female
Male
The total in-scope KPMG population for base pay gender pay reporting is 15,885, with a male/female split of 8,136/7,749. The quartiles set out the gender distribution across KPMG in four equally-sized quartiles.

Pay quartiles – colleagues / Q2 lower middle

54.4%
45.6%
Female
Male
The total in-scope KPMG population for base pay gender pay reporting is 15,885, with a male/female split of 8,136/7,749. The quartiles set out the gender distribution across KPMG in four equally-sized quartiles.

Pay quartiles – colleagues / Q3 upper middle

46.6%
53.4%
Female
Male
The total in-scope KPMG population for base pay gender pay reporting is 15,885, with a male/female split of 8,136/7,749. The quartiles set out the gender distribution across KPMG in four equally-sized quartiles.

Pay quartiles – colleagues / Q4 upper

38.9%
61.1%
Female
Male
The total in-scope KPMG population for base pay gender pay reporting is 15,885, with a male/female split of 8,136/7,749. The quartiles set out the gender distribution across KPMG in four equally-sized quartiles.

The ethnicity pay gap is the difference in average pay between all White and all ethnic minority employees, regardless of their role, level, length of service or location and any other differentiating factors.

We report our ethnicity pay gap on a voluntary basis.

Median pay gap as of April 2020, including partners
11.7%
Reduced by 0.9% points from 2019 (12.6%)
Mean pay gap as of April 2020, including partners
38.2%
Increased by 1.7% points from 2019 (36.5%)

The total in-scope KPMG population for base pay ethnicity pay reporting is 13,518 with a White/ethnic minority split of 9,554/ 3,964. Our ethnicity data is based on those individuals who have chosen to declare their ethnicity, which is 82% of the total in-scope population.

The mean pay gap is calculated by adding up all of the pay of KPMG employees and dividing it by the number of employees. The median pay gap is calculated by lining up all of KPMG's employees' pay and finding the mid-point for each category. The difference between those two mid points is the median pay gap.

Median basic pay gap as of April 2020, excluding partners
6.9%
Reduced by 1.0% points from 2019 (7.9%)
Mean basic pay gap as of April 2020, excluding partners
16.4%
Increased by 2.3% points from 2019 (14.1%)

This is the difference in average pay between White and ethnic minority colleagues, excluding partners.

The mean pay gap is calculated by adding up all of the pay of KPMG employees and dividing it by the number of employees. The median pay gap is calculated by lining up all of KPMG's employees' pay and finding the mid-point for each category. The difference between those two mid points is the median pay gap.

Median bonus pay gap as of April 2020, excluding partners
30.1%
Reduced by 3.2% points from 2019 (33.3%)
76.4% - % of ethnic minority individuals to receive a bonus
85.2% - % of White individuals to receive a bonus
Mean bonus pay gap as of April 2020, excluding partners
36.8%
Reduced by 3.6% points from 2019 (40.4%)
76.4% - % of ethnic minority individuals to receive a bonus
85.2% - % of White individuals to receive a bonus

This is the difference in average bonus paid between White and ethnic minority colleagues who received a bonus, excluding partners. The total in-scope KPMG population for bonus ethnicity pay reporting is 12,816 with a White/ethnic minority split of 9,238/3,578.

The mean pay gap is calculated by adding up all of the pay of KPMG employees and dividing it by the number of employees. The median pay gap is calculated by lining up all of KPMG's employees' pay and finding the mid-point for each category. The difference between those two mid points is the median pay gap.

Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4

Pay quartiles – colleagues / Q1 lower

34.1%
65.9%
Ethnic minority
White

Pay quartiles – colleagues / Q2 lower middle

32.7%
67.3%
Ethnic minority
White

Pay quartiles – colleagues / Q3 upper middle

36.4%
63.6%
Ethnic minority
White

Pay quartiles – colleagues / Q4 upper

22.2%
77.8%
Ethnic minority
White

The sexual orientation pay gap is the difference in average pay between those who have declared themselves heterosexual and those who have declared themselves as Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual, regardless of their role, level, length of service or location and any other differentiating factors. It has been calculated using the gender pay gap statutory methodology. This data does not include employees that have not declared their sexuality.

We report our sexual orientation pay gap on a voluntary basis.

Median sexual orientation pay gap as of April 2020, including partners
3%
Mean sexual orientation pay gap as of April 2020, including partners
8%

The mean pay gap is calculated by adding up all of the pay of KPMG employees and dividing it by the number of employees. The median pay gap is calculated by lining up all of KPMG's employees' pay and finding the mid-point for each category. The difference between those two mid points is the median pay gap.

The Black heritage pay gap is the difference between all employees of Black heritage and all employees not of Black heritage, regardless of their role, level, length of service or location and any other differentiating factors.

We report our black heritage pay gap on a voluntary basis.

Median Black heritage pay gap as of April 2020, including partners
9.6%
Mean Black heritage pay gap as of April 2020, including partners
39.3%

The mean pay gap is calculated by adding up all of the pay of KPMG employees and dividing it by the number of employees. The median pay gap is calculated by lining up all of KPMG's employees' pay and finding the mid-point for each category. The difference between those two mid points is the median pay gap.

The disability pay gap is the difference in average pay between employees who have declared themselves as having a disability and those who have declared that they do not have a disability, regardless of their role, level, length of service or location and any other differentiating factors. It has been calculated using the gender pay gap statutory methodology. This data does not include employees that have not declared whether or not they have a disability.

We report our disbaility pay gap on a voluntary basis.

Median disability pay gap as of April 2020, including partners
10%
Mean disability pay gap as of April 2020, including partners
10%

The mean pay gap is calculated by adding up all of the pay of KPMG employees and dividing it by the number of employees. The median pay gap is calculated by lining up all of KPMG's employees' pay and finding the mid-point for each category. The difference between those two mid points is the median pay gap.

Our pay ratio

We're committed to transparency and on a voluntary basis publish the ratio of our UK Chair and Senior Partner's total remuneration to that of our employees at the 25th, 50th and 75th percentile (calculated on a full-time equivalent basis).

In 2021, our firm's governance structure was changed by separating the roles of Chair and Chief Executive. Going forward, we will report on the remuneration and pay ratio of our Chief Executive.

UK Chair and Senior Partner remuneration / £1.7m FY20
Pay ratio / 25th percentile FY20
(FY19: 56:1)
Pay ratio / 50th percentile* FY20
(FY19: 37:1)
Pay ratio / 75th percentile FY20
(FY19: 24:1)

The year-on-year reduction in the ratio reflects the lower total remuneration of the Chair in FY20 compared to FY19.
*This also represents employees' median pay and benefits