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For more than 30 years Poland has been an attractive market for foreign investors who appreciate the country’s openness, geographic location and economic stability. Businesses that have decided to locate their capital here can benefit from a number of incentives and enjoy having access to well-educated workforce and a large internal market. These features make Poland one of the biggest recipients of greenfield investments in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as a target country for numerous M&A transactions made by foreign entities.

After Brexit, Poland has become the sixth largest economy in the European Union. Over the last decade (2009-2019), its GDP grew by 3.6% per year on average. At the end of 2019, Poland’s liabilities under foreign direct investments (FDI) amounted to EUR 209.5 billion. Throughout the year, foreign investors invested EUR 9.7 billion net, which comprised reinvested earnings of EUR 10.1 billion, equity and shares of EUR 1 billion and debt instruments worth EUR -1.4 billion.

Economic growth in Poland is driven by domestic demand, primarily private consumption, which, in turn, results from low unemployment and rising wages. From a level of well over ten per cent in the early 21st century, the unemployment rate fell below the EU average, to 2.9%, at the end of 2019. In 2019, Poland recorded a slightly positive balance of trade in goods, exporting EUR 235.8 billion worth of products. At that time, imports were lower by less than EUR 2 billion, amounting to EUR 234 billion. Only a year earlier, Poland’s trade balance in goods was slightly negative but has remained relatively close to zero year after year. More than a half of gross added value in Poland is produced in wholesale and retail trade, transport and HoReCa and in the industrial sector. These sectors also generate the largest share of all jobs.

After Brexit, Poland has become the sixth largest economy in the European Union. Over the last decade (2009-2019), its GDP grew by 3.6% per year on average.

Focus areas

Condition of Poland’s economy

After Brexit, Poland has become the sixth largest economy in the European Union. Over the last decade (2009-2019), its GDP grew by 3.6% per year on average.

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Foreign investment in Poland

Revenues earned by foreign investors have been visibly rising, exceeding EUR 20 billion in 2019, which is more than twice the figure recorded a decade ago.

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Forms of conducting business activity

Foreign investors clearly prefer the limited liability company as the optimal formula for doing business in Poland.

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Tax regulations

The Polish tax authorities hold power to undertake a tax audit in the five years after a tax liability arises and to reassess the amount of that tax liability.

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Statutory financial statements and reporting requirements

The statutory financial statements of entities in Poland consists of the following elements: balance sheet, profit and loss accounts and notes to the financial statements.

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Which investment destination to choose?

There are 7 Macroregions made up of 16 Voivodships with different maximum aid intensity under the Polish Investment Zone where entrepreneur can running a business in Poland.

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Video Infographic | Few facts about Poland

Poland is 6th largest economy in the European Union. The publication presents key economic indicators, describes the M&A market and legal and tax issues of key importance for investing in Poland.

Key Themes

Poland is 5th largest EU Member State in terms of population

EUR 235.8 billion - goods exports from Poland in 2019

EUR 234.0 billion - goods imports into Poland in 2019

Poland had the third longest rail network in the EU in 2018

247 - announced M&A transactions in Poland in 2019

Poland is 6th largest economy in the European Union

See how we could assist you to start investing in Poland

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