close
Share with your friends

Foresight: Infrastructure resilience

Infrastructure resilience

The global climate is shifting, mass urbanization is on the rise, automation is reshaping the labour market, and the pace of development is increasing

1000
Chris Sainsbury

Senior Manager, Advisory National Leader for Smart Cities

KPMG in Canada

Contact

Related content

bike on city bike lane

​Canada, like the rest of the world, is facing disruption on an unprecedented scale. The global climate is shifting, mass urbanization is on the rise, automation is reshaping the labour market, and the pace of development is increasing. As detailed in KPMG International's 2018 Emerging Trends in Infrastructure report, these are some of the trends that will have a dramatic impact on the infrastructure landscape in the years to come.

Increasingly, public and private organizations are realizing the importance of infrastructure resilience. Resilience, as a concept, is the capacity of individuals, communities, institutions, businesses, governments, and systems within a city to survive, adapt, and grow amid major upheaval. This capacity stems from preparedness—a truly resilient city is one that has the capacity to thrive in spite of both acute shocks and chronic stresses.

Acute shocks are sudden events, such as natural disasters, disease outbreaks, acts of terrorism, and infrastructure failure. These are the events that often spring to mind when people think about resilience. Yet, equally relevant are longer-term chronic stresses such as housing affordability, unemployment, aging infrastructure, and commodity supply/demand. These chronic stresses are particularly pertinent in a province like British Columbia, which is struggling with soaring house prices, increasing poverty (especially in Indigenous communities), and an opioid crisis.

Download the full article to learn more.

Connect with us

 

Want to do business with KPMG?

 

loading image Request for proposal